DIY Niffler Plushie – Fantastic Beasts and How to Make Them | @laurenfairwx

DIY Niffler Plushie – Fantastic Beasts and How to Make Them | @laurenfairwx


This tutorial video has been one of the most-requested
crafts in the comments of my videos ever since the first Fantastic Beasts movie came out.
Today, I am so excited to show you how to make your very own Niffler plushie, complete
with a tiny pocket perfect for hiding shiny things. I thought the Niffler in Fantastic Beasts
was adorable and hilarious and as soon as I saw the movie, I knew that I had to go home
and design a plush version of him in my style. Give this video a thumbs up if you loved this
mischievous little critter as much as I did! I also designed a bowtruckle plushie so be
sure to stick around to the end of the video to see how that one turned out and learn how
to make that as well! And if you’re new here, I’d love if you
would subscribe so you can join my nerdy and crafty little online family. Check the video description below for a list
of materials and a link to the free pattern pdf, and here’s how to make a super cute
Niffler plushie with a teeny little pocket. Start out by printing out the pattern pdf
I linked to in the video description and cut out all of the pieces. Then, take a small
piece of beige fleece, place the heart shape on the good side of the fabric, and cut around
it. Do the same for the paw shape! Then for the
second paw, flip the template over and cut it out that way so you’ll get a mirror image.
Next up is the nose! Give the fabric a tug to find the direction that the fleece stretches
– see how one way is much stretchier than the other? Place the nose shape so the long
nose is pointing the same way as the stretch, because we want it to stretch out longer when
we stuff it. AND we’ll need two of this shape, so fold the fabric in half with the
good sides of the fleece facing out. That stretch should still be there. Pin the template to both layers of fabric,
and carefully cut around the shape. This is where some nice, sharp fabric shears will
come in handy. When you’re done, remove the pin and you should have two nose pieces.
Put the top one aside, then cut like this across the larger round edge on the bottom
piece. So the top still has the round edge and the bottom of the nose will just have
a normal, straight edge. Cut out two little round eyes on black felt
using the tiny circle template and once we have all of those little details set, we can
move on to making the body shape and the pocket. You’ll need some dark brown fleece! Place
the pocket shape onto a small piece of it, leaving a little space above the straight side, then
cut it out with maybe an extra half an inch or more above that straight edge, which we’ll
need for seam allowance, juuust like that. Now, fold that straight edge back so we can
hem it for a nice, finished open edge on the pocket. Pin it in place, and be ready to sew
one line across that edge through both layers. Pop it into your sewing machine if you have
one and remember to sew forwards and backwards in the beginning and again at the end to keep
it from unraveling. If you want, you can also sew this by hand using a back stitch. I’m
going to link to more detailed tutorials for every stitch I use in this tutorial so read
the video description if you need help. Trim the extra threads and your pocket should
look like this! Next, grab the main body shape and note the direction of the arrows printed
on the template. Here, I have a bigger piece of the same dark brown fleece as the pocket,
folded in half with the good side facing in, so the wrong sides are facing out. Now, give
the fabric a tug in each direction to see which one is stretchier – you’ll want to
put the template so the arrows are pointing in the stretchy direction. Mark each side of a two inch spot at the bottom
of the pattern so you’ll know where to leave a gap when sewing, then flip the template
over and put it face down onto the fabric. Trace around the pattern with a marker and
make sure to mark where that gap will be; it should look like this. Cut loosely around the shape, I just do a
rectangle giving myself plenty of space to sew because fleece is a little tough to turn
in a sewing machine. And now for a bit of a tricky part – placing the pocket! Take your
front piece, which is the one that has the marker outline on it, separate it from the
back piece, and flip it so the front side is facing up. Now, we’re going to want this to be placed
right in the middle of the body section of the Niffler, but on the front side – so we
won’t really be able to see the outline we drew for reference. To get the placement
right anyway, I like to put the pocket where I want it to go on the side with the outline,
then poke a few sewing pins through the fabric at the corners and along the bottom edge.
That way, when you remove the pocket and flip it over, you can place the pocket, right side
up, inside those pins. Pin the pocket itself to that front piece, remove the guide pins
from before, and we’re ready to sew it on, close to the edge and all around the curved
part of the shape – leaving the hemmed straight edge open. Start at one corner of the pocket, go forward
a few stitches and then back a few to secure it, then really carefully sew the curved edge
of the pocket to the front fabric piece. Make sure you don’t get too close to the edge
because you could end up with a hole and you’ll have to go back and stitch over it again.
Once you’ve reached the other corner, stop and go backwards again to lock those stitches
in. It should look something like this now! Trim
off the excess threads and you can also trim the edge of the pocket a little if the fold
was awkward like mine was right here. And yay! A cute, tiny pocket. Now, bring back
the other piece of fabric you separated earlier, make sure the good, fuzzy side is up, and
flip the side with the pocket over, face down onto that. The edges should match up because
you cut them together before and the outline should be right there on top. I’m adding one of my logo tags to the seam
here, but don’t do this unless it’s on a plushie you’ve designed yourself. And
now, just pin those two layers together inside the outline but not too close to it. For the
next step, we’ll be sewing them together starting at one end of the gap, going all
around the body shape and the head, back down the other side, and stopping at the other
side of that gap. Don’t sew through the gap we marked; you’ll need to leave that
open. Back on the sewing machine, I’m sewing right
on that line we drew, stopping to turn the piece at the corners. There’s a spot at
the top of the head where the hair is that’s a little tricky to see, but other than that,
it’s a pretty simple shape to sew around. Stop when you reach the other end of the line,
and there we go! It should look like this. Trim the long threads and pull out the pins. Next, trim around the seams, being careful
not to cut into any of your stitches. To keep the shape smooth when I turn it right side
out, I also like to clip these little v-shapes into the curves and corners. After that, open
up the gap we left at the bottom and turn the whole piece right side out! You can use
a stick to push the seams and poke out any corners or details. Then, stuff the plush using small handfuls
of fiberfill. I start by pushing the stuffing into the far end and I keep going until the
piece takes shape. When you’re happy with the way it’s stuffed, press the gap shut
and pin it like this. We’re going to use ladder stitch to sew it shut. Thread a needle and tie a big knot at the
end, then start by pushing the needle down into the gap and up through the folded edge
on one side where you want the stitching to start. Flip the piece around, then push
your needle down into the opposite folded edge, straight across the gap before pushing
it back up again on that same fold, just a little bit over. When you give it a tug, that’s
your first stitch! Ladder stitch continues by going back and forth across the gap and
up the sides until you’ve closed the whole thing, and again, if you need a more detailed
tutorial for this stitch, I’ll link to my ladder stitch lesson in the video description
below. When you reach the end, tie a knot by grabbing
one of the stitches at the end with your needle, and hook the needle through the loop in the
thread that forms so it’ll make a knot. Tie one more for good luck, then hide your
excess thread by pushing the needle down into the plush right where the knot is and push
it out over here somewhere. That way, once you tug on it and cut the extra thread, it’ll
get lost inside the plush. Now we’re ready to add all of the details! Let’s start with the nose. I’ve got the
two pieces together with the right sides out and I’m going to sew starting at one corner,
around the long nose side, and stopping at the other corner leaving this side open. Hold
them together with a pin, thread a needle with some matching thread, tie a knot at the
end, and start between the two pieces of fabric, pushing your needle down and out so the knot
will stay hidden inside the nose. For this part, I’ll be using whipstitch
and I’ve linked to a tutorial for that as well if you need a refresher! Basically, you
wrap the needle around the side and push it down diagonally so it comes out next to your
previous stitch. Keep repeating that motion, wrapping around then push down diagonally,
so you get these stitches that are parallel to each other, attaching your two nose pieces
together right at the edges. Don’t tie off the thread this time though because we’ll
need it later to attach it to the face! Just kind of drop it for now. It’s starting to look more like the niffler’s
long, rounded nose! I decided to add two little nostrils by stitching one short line on either
side of the top half with some pearl cotton thread. To tie that off, I kind of grabbed
onto some of the thread on the inside and tied a double knot on there before trimming
the thread. Take a couple small whisps of fiberfill and gently stuff the end of the
nose, using a stick to push it in there. So just for reference, the nose is going to
be attached to the heart shape, which I use for many of my plushie faces. Take those two
black felt circles and decide where you want the eyes to be placed in relation to the nose,
which we’ll be stitching on later. Then, using a needle and some black thread, whipstitch
each eye to the heart shaped face. For these, start your needle going up from the back of
the heart so the knots stay on that back side. It looks similar to the whipstitch we did
on the nose earlier, but the motion changes a little when we’re adding a flat appliqué
like this. Once both of those eyes are secure, flip the piece over and tie two knots onto
one of the threads on the back and trim the end. To add highlights to the eyes, thread and
knot some white embroidery floss and embroider a french knot onto the upper inside corner
of each eye. These are a little tricky and can take some practice tries, but like before,
I’m adding a more detailed tutorial for that to the video description. Poke the needle
up from the back where you want the knot to go and pull it tight. Wrap the thread around
the needle twice, close to the fabric, then without unlooping the thread, push the needle
back down pretty close to where it came up and carefully pull it so the wrapped
thread eventually makes a little knot right up against the fabric. Repeat this on the
other eye, then tie a knot on the back in the same way we were doing earlier to secure
it. Now, gather all of the pieces because we’re
ready to attach them all together! Start by pinning the paws to either side of the pocket
and whipstitch each one in place. For this one, start the knot under the paw so it gets
hidden between the paw and the front of the body shape and stitch all the way around. To secure this kind of appliqué when you
get back around to where you started, use your needle to grab that first stitch, pull
until you get a small loop in the thread, and put the needle through that loop before
you pull it tight – this will give you a small knot along the edge and you can hide the excess
thread by pushing it into the plushie and snipping off the excess over here so it gets
lost inside. Then you can start on the other paw! When
you’re sewing on the claws, make sure that you don’t stitch the pocket shut if they
overlap with the pocket like mine do. Just make a shallower stitch and check occasionally
to make sure the pocket still opens. Tie it off at the end, and look how cute this is!
The pocket takes a fair bit of work but I think it gives it so much personality. Next, put the face where you want it to go
on the head and pin it into place. We’ll be whipstitching this on the exact same way
as the paws, but there are less little details and no pocket to worry about so it’s quite
a bit easier. Once that’s all tied off, we can add the nose! Push to make sure the
stuffing stays inside, then place the open edges flat against the face shape with the
rounded part on top, closest to the eyes. This one’s kind of tough to pin down because
it’s already stuffed, but it’ll make your life a lot easier if it stays put while you’re
sewing. Using the thread that’s still attached to
the corner of the nose piece from before, carefully whipstitch up the top rounded half
of the nose piece where it touches the face. When you reach the opposite corner, stop for
a second and take the opportunity to add a little bit more stuffing if you need to. This
is easier now that half of it is already attached. Then, continue stitching along the remaining
edge until the nose is totally attached to the face. Tie one last double knot, hiding
the excess inside the plush, and admire your work because we are all done! I am so excited to have this plushie designed
and made and ready to share with all of you because like I said earlier, it has been so
highly requested and I’ve been wanting to do it for a while. And now you can have your
very own little niffler buddy to get into trouble with! I had so much fun making this little guy!
It was kind of a challenge figuring out how to do the pointy nose and the claws and I
knew that he needed a pouch just like the one in the movie, but I ended up being really
happy with the finished product and I hope you are too! If you make one of my niffler plushies yourself,
I would love so much if you’d post a picture of it on Facebook, twitter, or instagram and
tag me @laurenfairwx so I can see how it turned out! And if you loved this tutorial, definitely
share it with any wizarding world enthusiasts you know. Of course, there are so many magical creatures
in the Fantastic Beasts series and I want to make a bunch of them into plushies, so
I also made a bowtruckle! This guy was probably my favorite creature in the first movie so
I couldn’t resist designing my own version of him. To watch my bowtruckle plush tutorial next,
click the link in the card above or in the video description below! And if you have a request
for what my next plushie should be, tell me in the comments! Thank you so much for watching and I’ll see
you soon!

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